asylum-art:

Sculptures and Paintings by Kim Kei

Kim Kei lives and works in Los Angeles. Her process begins with combining and altering everyday objects and natural debris. These malleable sculptures are photographed in several iterations, which become the foundation for her paintings. Her intricate, improvised compositions exist somewhere between representation and abstraction. Her work is a departure from the figure as a form, yet in its absence the body is implied.

1. Mimesis 6

2. Mimesis 1
3. Mimesis 2

4. Mimesis 3
5. Mimesis 5

6. Mimesis 4

7. Now Afloat, She Unfolds
Watermedia and oil on paper mounted on panel
12″x18″

8. She Knew She Would Unwind
12″ x 18″
watermedia and oil on paper mounted on panel

9. They Let it go, Let it Rise 
Watermedia and oil on paper mounted on panel
16″x 20″

10. Into The Air with Two Ideas 
20″ x 30″
watermedia and oil on paper

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

John Grade: Sculptures and installations

Sculptures and installations by Seattle-based artist John Grade.

This series marks a pivotal transition couched between the larger works and featured new sculpture in wood and resin (example: Core) as well as two in iron, cast at the Kohler facility during Grades installation of Capacitor. For Grade, the human scale pieces are especially important as “they act as fertile ground – allowing time to reflect, experiment and explore alternative directions and sub themes that cannot be hit within the larger works.”

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

“Humorous and Disconcerting” Tomoo Gokita

With a lifelong practice of drawing, professional experience in graphic design, and early success in creating newsprint books, Tomoo Gokita began around 2005 to create works on canvas that demonstrated his virtuosity with tonal range. For the current show, in paintings of varying sizes, he presents dazzling possibilities for black and white. Velvety matte black gouache contrasts with pristine white gesso. Smears, scrapes, scumbles, and drips introduce every texture, character, and gradation of gray. The paintings have the restraining effect of Photostats of very colorful subjects.humoristique et déconcertant.

These subjects - all portraits - are a source of intrigue. By giving the paintings titles such as Showgirl, Geisha Girl, A Bathing Beauty, Cocktail Pianist from Acapulco, Daughter of a Fraudster, A Female Spy, Gokita points to dated archetypes lifted from pulp fiction, Hollywood rags, and film noir. The full or half-length figures appear in a state of deconstruction or deterioration appropriate to their origin in memory, their resurrection from the past: flesh morphs and melts, with faces obscured by a mask or veil of paint. Like the cryptic fantasies of the Surrealist painters, Gokita conjures a world at once humorous and disconcerting. Tomoo Gokita was born in 1969 in Tokyo, Japan, where he continues to live and work.

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

Lin Tianmiao

on artnet

At Galerie Lelong

Lin Tianmiao is a Chinese born artist who studied in the U.S.A during the early 1980’s, where she soon become a successful textile designer. Her career as an artist did not begin until she moved back to China in 1994 with her artist husband where they opened up their hutong studio to show their works to the public. She was quickly placed into the group of female Chinese artists making nuxing yishu ‘female art’.

Lin Tianmiao’s paintings, sculptures, and installations have always been about a series of dual tensions. These are frequently played out in her works through contrasts between materials, but they are also evident in binary themes such as male versus female, function versus form, and physical versus psychological experience. Underlying all of these themes is a keen exploration of a physical experience, at times emphasizing the female body. We see this in the works Chatting and Mothers!!!.
Lin is one of only a handful of women artists of her generation born in the 1960s to have emerged during the 1990s when the Chinese art world was coming of age and gaining substantial international recognition. Her works over the past twenty years are as much about her personal journey as an artist as they are about a desire to articulate broader social issues. Through her focus on a female experience, she comments on the enormous social progress made in Chinese society during Mao Zedong’s tenure, yet she hints that some promises remain unfulfilled. Her consistent exploration of these issues, sometimes latent, makes her a significant artist of our time. This exhibition represents Lin Tianmiao’s first major solo exhibition in the United States.
Bound Unbound: Lin Tianmiao is part of Asia Society’s yearlong programmatic focus on China, titled China Close Up.

(via asylum-art)

blastedheath:

Vieira Rodrigues (Portuguese, b. 1947), Tree of life, 2013. Enamel on acrylic glass, 120 x 110 cm.

blastedheath:

Vieira Rodrigues (Portuguese, b. 1947), Tree of life, 2013. Enamel on acrylic glass, 120 x 110 cm.

blastedheath:

Christopher Fennell (American, b. 1966), Snag, 2008. Acrylic, spraypaint and paper collage on paper,  59 x 41 in.

blastedheath:

Christopher Fennell (American, b. 1966), Snag, 2008. Acrylic, spraypaint and paper collage on paper,  59 x 41 in.

asylum-art:

Kevin Townsend: wells of Mimir revisited-passive drawing

Still photographs of the passive drawing, ‘wells of Mimir revisited’. For this work, the drawing is made over time as the cast ice vessels melt, and their ability to contain ink breaks down, resulting in a release of ink. As the vessels melt capillary action pulls the ink through fissures and faults in the ice creating temporary and unpredictable drawings within each cube before the ink is ultimately released to the paper. Once released the ink mingles with and is diluted by the water from the dissolving vessels before being captured and held as a stain in the fibers of the cotton paper.